One who intends to leave others better off for his having existed.

6/29/14

“euphoric” financial markets have become detached from the reality of a lingering post-crisis malaise"

“Particularly for countries in the late stages of financial booms, the trade-off is now between the risk of bringing forward the downward leg of the cycle and that of suffering a bigger bust later on”

The BIS, the bank for central banks, has been a longstanding sceptic about the benefits of ultra-stimulative monetary and fiscal policies and its latest intervention reflects mounting concern that the rebound in capital markets and real estate is built on fragile foundations.

Overall, it is hard to avoid the sense of a puzzling disconnect between the markets’ buoyancy and underlying economic developments globally.

Instead of adding to productive capacity, large firms prefer to buy back shares or engage in mergers and acquisitions. And despite lacklustre long-term growth prospects, debt continues to rise. There is even talk of secular stagnation.

Financial markets have been exuberant over the past year, [...] dancing mainly to the tune of central bank decisions.

Volatility in equity, fixed income and foreign exchange markets has sagged to historical lows. Obviously, market participants are pricing in hardly any risks.

...Financial markets are euphoric, but progress in strengthening banks’ balance sheets has been uneven and private debt keeps growing.

...Never before have central banks tried to push so hard.

...Few are ready to curb financial booms that make everyone feel illusively richer.  Or to hold back on quick fixes for output slowdowns, even if such measures threaten to add fuel to unsustainable financial booms. Or to address balance sheet problems head-on during a bust when seemingly easier policies are on offer. The temptation to go for shortcuts is simply too strong, even if these shortcuts lead nowhere in the end."

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-06-29/bis-slams-market-euphoria-finds-puzzling-disconnect-between-economy-and-market

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